The province of Batangas in the Philippines is well-known for its beautiful and clean beaches that are just a couple of miles away from the bustle and hustle of the metro. It is the most common weekend destination for people who want to escape the city life and just relax without the hassle of traveling for hours. One of the recent discoveries I’ve had is the Masasa Beach in Tingloy Island, Batangas.

Masasa Beach
The iconic rock formation of Masasa Beach.

How to get there

Tingloy Island in the province of Batangas is 3-4 hours away from Manila.

  1. From Cubao or Pasay, ride a bus bound for Batangas Pier (Jam Liner or Alps) and get off at Batangas Grand Terminal.
  2. From Batangas Grand Terminal, ride a jeep bound to Mabini and tell the driver to drop you off at Talaga Port. Note: There are two (2) ports going to Tingloy Island – Anilao Port and Talaga Port. When it’s the Amihan Weather, it is advisable to go to Anilao Port, while on Habagat Weather, Talaga Port
  3. From the port, ride a passenger boat going to Tingloy Island. Travel time is around 30-45 minutes.

    Passenger boat going to Tingloy Island.
    Passenger boat going to Tingloy Island.
  4. From Tingloy Port, ride a tricycle and tell the driver that you’re going to Masasa Beach.

    Tingloy Port
    Tingloy Port
  5. There are no tricycles that will drop you off exactly at Masasa Beach. You have to walk to a dry rice field for 10-15 minutes before reaching the beach.

    Rice Field
    Rice Field

Where to stay

  1. Pitch a tent.
  2. Nanay Rosie’s kubo. Nanay Rosie is the only one who accommodates guests without tents and her rooms are very limited so make an early reservation. You may contact her at 09196864368.

What to do

  1. Camping
  2. Beach bumming
  3. Island hopping
  4. Snorkeling
  5. Explore the rock formations
  6. Trek the nearby peak to see the Mag-asawang Bato Rock Formation
  7. Cliff jump on one of the rock formations
  8. Watch the sunset

The beach

Masasa beach is not as beautiful as I had expected since it is a public beach and the municipality isn’t collecting any fee for the preservation of the beach. Based from other blogs that I’ve read, the beach is quite dirty with loads of garbage left by some campers. Fortunately, the beach was clean and garbage-free when we got there because of the clean-up drive conducted by some volunteers after Super Typhoon Lawin hit the country.

The beach is a long stretch of fine brownish sands and clear blue water. There are no hotels or beach cottages but there are some areas perfect for pitching tents. Some parts are rocky but can be easily avoided.

The beach
The beach
The rocky part of the beach.
The rocky part of the beach.

The weather was gloomy earlier but soon became bright and clear. The sea is incredibly clear and the reefs are nice and seem to be untouched, an ideal spot for snorkeling. It didn’t disappoint, indeed, the marine life is abundant and we’ve sighted some sea turtles too.

The deep blue sea and clear skies. Lucky us. :)
The deep blue sea and clear skies. Lucky us. 🙂
Starfish!
Starfish!

You can look and touch but just make sure to bring them back to the water where they belong. One of the things I loved about Masasa is its clear blue water. The marine lives can be easily seen even without getting off the boat. After an hour of snorkeling, we walked through the long stretch of the beach to explore the places we haven’t seen yet and to see the rock formations.

The iconic rock formation of Masasa Beach that seems to form a natural pool because of its structure.
The iconic rock formation of Masasa Beach that seems to form a natural pool because of its structure.
A closer look at the part that looks like a natural pool.
A closer look at the part that looks like a natural pool.
The rock formation which is ideal for cliff jumping.
The rock formation which is ideal for cliff jumping.

My travel buddy even brought her ukulele and we enjoyed singing on the rocky shore. We chose this particular spot because it was less crowded.

My HS best friend Jhaz and her ukulele.
My high school best friend Jhaz and her ukulele.

Ukulele

We really had some fun singing and swimming. The next day, we rose up early to catch the first boat trip going back to Talaga Port. We also explored the part of the beach that we missed yesterday. Bringing my cup of coffee while walking early in the morning along the shore, we saw a lot of camping tents and some campers sleeping soundly on the sand.

My cup of coffee, the beach and the early morning breeze.
My cup of coffee, the beach and the early morning breeze.
One of the iconic rock formations that can be found on the farther side of the beach.
One of the iconic rock formations that can be found on the farther side of the beach.
And of course, we didn't miss the sunrise.
And of course, we didn’t miss the sunrise.

Tips

  • The first trip of the passenger boat going to Tingloy Island leaves at 10:00 AM and the last trip leaves at 3:00 PM.
  • The first trip of the passenger boat leaving Tingloy Island going back to Talaga Port is 6:00 AM and the last trip is 9:00 AM.
  • Electricity runs only from 12:00 noon to 6:00 AM.
  • There are no restaurants in the island so buy your foods in the market on the port.
  • Always practice the LNT (Leave No Trace) principle to preserve the beach. Don’t just throw away your trash on the shore, instead, bring your own garbage bags.
  • Bring mosquito repellents and sunblock.

Budget and Itinerary

For more or less Php 1,000.00 you may enjoy an overnight getaway at Masasa Beach.

Day 1
7:00 AM ETD Manila Via Jam Liner 165.00
10:00 AM ETA Batangas Grand Terminal
10:15 AM ETD Jeep to Talaga Port 27.00
11:30 AM ETA Talaga Port
12:00 NN ETD Passenger Boat going to Tingloy Island 65.00
12:45 PM ETA Tingloy Island
Tricycle to Masasa Beach 30.00
Accommodation at Nanay Rosie’s Kubo 250.00
Snorkeling (100.00/person/hr) 100.00
Day 2
6:00 AM Tricycle to Tingloy Port 30.00
Passenger Boat to Talaga Port 65.00
7:00 AM ETA Talaga Port
Jeep to Batangas Grand Terminal 27.00
8:00 AM ETD Batangas Grand Terminal 165.00
11:00 AM ETA Manila
TOTAL 924.00

 

 

 

 

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